2011-03-03 / Outdoors

Training for an ice emergency


ON THEIR OWN Students practice getting out of the water on their own during the beginning of an ice rescue training session Thursday at Lake Sherwood. Sergeant John Meka of the DNRE said the one-day session was the first ice rescue training that state conservation officers have had since 2006, the last year they ran a recruit school. He said funding for the training came from a grant from the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards. ON THEIR OWN Students practice getting out of the water on their own during the beginning of an ice rescue training session Thursday at Lake Sherwood. Sergeant John Meka of the DNRE said the one-day session was the first ice rescue training that state conservation officers have had since 2006, the last year they ran a recruit school. He said funding for the training came from a grant from the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards. Department of Natural Resources and Environment conservation officers from all over the state had their first ice rescue training since 2006 during a one-day program in Roscommon County Feb. 24. The training, led by Michigan Rescue Concepts, Richmond included classroom work at the DNRE’s Ralph A. MacMullan Conference Center at Higgins Lake in the morning, and ice practice at Lake Sherwood in Markey Township during the afternoon.

Officers were trained in a variety of techniques useful for rescuing others as well as for getting themselves out of the water if they ever fell through the ice.



THROWING A LINE Missaukee County Paramedic Alan Devereaux throws Conservation Officer Rian Engelhard a line, part of a rescue tether kit held in place on the other end by an ice screw. Officers were taught to aim at a point beyond the rescue subject to allow them a better chance to grab hold of the line and throw bag . Photos and text by Thomas Reznich THROWING A LINE Missaukee County Paramedic Alan Devereaux throws Conservation Officer Rian Engelhard a line, part of a rescue tether kit held in place on the other end by an ice screw. Officers were taught to aim at a point beyond the rescue subject to allow them a better chance to grab hold of the line and throw bag . Photos and text by Thomas Reznich

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