2012-09-06 / Outdoors

New dam to help keep Wraco Lake at proper level, DNR biologist says


DAM TO SET ‘PERMANENT WATER LEVEL’ (Left to right) Jake Wangler and Perry Dagle of Porath Contractors place boulders in the stream bed of Wolf Creek as they construct a dam at the outlet of Wraco Lake Aug. 28. Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Biologist Mark Boersen (right) said the dam will provide a “permanent water level” in the 200-acre lake, which he said would be about three feet lower than it was as construction of the dam continued. 
(Photo by Thomas Reznich) DAM TO SET ‘PERMANENT WATER LEVEL’ (Left to right) Jake Wangler and Perry Dagle of Porath Contractors place boulders in the stream bed of Wolf Creek as they construct a dam at the outlet of Wraco Lake Aug. 28. Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Biologist Mark Boersen (right) said the dam will provide a “permanent water level” in the 200-acre lake, which he said would be about three feet lower than it was as construction of the dam continued. (Photo by Thomas Reznich) A new “maintenance free” dam was installed by the Department of Natural Resources on Wolf Creek at the outlet of Wraco Lake last week, in hopes of bringing the lake “back to its natural level,” according to DNR Wildlife Biologist Mark Boersen.

The lake, located in the former Wraco Lodge property north of Wraco Road about a mile east of Old 27, will maintain a level about three feet lower than it had been with the old lake level control structure which the new dam replaces. Boerson said the lower water will benefit wildlife, especially in the marsh areas adjoining the lake and creek, and help cut down on bank erosion.

He said the DNR acquired the 1,600- acre property in 2010 from a private individual, and that in addition to offering hunting and fishing opportunities, it is also available for dispersed camping. Along with the new dam, which is constructed of steel sheet piling and limestone boulders, there will also be a new parking area near Wraco Road.

Boersen said the area is now part of the 285,000-acre Roscommon State Forest. He said the DNR’s Wildlife Division is responsible for all dams in state wildlife areas.

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